Kandinsky Ketubah detail 1
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 1
Kandinsky ketubah detail 2
Kandinsky ketubah detail 2
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 3
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 3
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 4
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 4
Kandinsky Ketubah
Kandinsky Ketubah
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 1
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 1The striking color palette is used similar to colors chosen by Kandinsk, to break down our understanding of visual objects by taking away some of the context we are accustomed to seeing in the natural world.
Kandinsky ketubah detail 2
Kandinsky ketubah detail 2Showing text in Hebrew and English - a closeup of the circles and triangles. Repetition of geometric forms to break down classical understandings of formal composition were a common theme in Kandinsky's art.
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 3
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 3As was common in art of the modern period, areas of the design are left unpainted. Artists of the time attempted to stretch the viewers understanding of 'finished' and fine art by leaving areas of canvas unpainted.
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 4
Kandinsky Ketubah detail 4In Hebrew and English across the center is a line from a short poem by Judah Al-Harizi that reads, "Look: the sun has spread its wings to dispel the darkness from the earth." This quote cannot be substituted as it is part of the paintingAlthough breaking down barriers in traditional art, the art of the time period was frequently representational (meaning it was an interpretation of objects as we see them). The poem works in the modern art context on two levels - clarifying the subject matter of the painting and as graphic objects in and of themselves, although artists of the time period would probably have used disconnected letters rather than words or phrases.
Kandinsky Ketubah
Kandinsky KetubahTriangles and circles, geometric shapes, and Hebrew lettering come together in homage to the great painter. In Hebrew and English across the lower corner is a line from a short poem by Judah Al-Harizi that reads, "Look: the sun has spread its wings to dispel the darkness from the earth." The circle for texts is equally suited for single language or Hebrew and English language texts. For single language texts, the smaller prints may be more suitable.
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